Why training for performance works

Most people develop fitness goals that revolve around image, measurements, or to "feel good." Specifically, after people are past their glory days of athletic competition, the desire to train tends to go by the wayside and is replaced with social eating, drinking, or binge-watching the newest Netflix show. Don't get me wrong, I have watched The Office in its entirety too many times, and everyone knows how much I enjoy a good Sunday brunch with friends. I won't try to pretend that exercise is my life and nothing matters more than how much I can deadlift . I do love fitness, but I to go through ruts where I simply can't convince myself that doing a workout to maintain a healthy weight or that avoiding IPAs to fight off a beer belly, are actually worth the effort. 

Goals dependent on a scale, mirror, or an arbitrary feeling of "goodness" lack something that fuels most people, a deadline. Deadlines help keep people focused. Whether you are in college and you have a research paper due or you work in sales and meeting a required quota based on a specific timeline with the possibility of reward or punishment will help to motivate individuals. When weight-loss is a goal we tend to see people struggle to maintain motivation because of the constant swings in weight from day to day, the length of time it takes to reach said goal, and the ability to so easily to return to the initial weight after achieving that target weight. 

Goals based on image can be very dangerous because many develop or already have issues seeing their positive traits. These people can slip into a state of body dysmorphia where they never think they "look good" or can never be thin enough. What you look like shouldn't be a goal, but a positive bi-product of your healthy habits. Eating healthy, fresh foods that aren't only following your proper caloric intake but are full of vitamins and minerals will yield a healthier-looking you. Not only will your body composition improve but your skin, hair, and overall aura will resemble your efforts. All these changes come with time and you will come as a result of consistency over time.

Having performance based goals doesn't mean you have to train for some crazy event like the CrossFit Games or an ultra-marathon. What performance training relates to is training with the intent to improve. For some, improvement might be to set a PR in their 1600m.  For others it means they want to do be able to do their first pull up before the end of summer. Targeting a performance-based goal has value in the mind and heart of the trainee. The great thing about these goals is they can increase in value. The longer you train for a specific performance-goal the more invested you become and the more likely you are are to make decisions revolving around achieving your goal. Unlike weight related goals, performance goals aren't complete until the day of competition or you have achieved what it is you set out to do. When we start feeling better about the way we look or we get near our goal-weight it is common to see a relapse and a false sense of achievement. 

Having a goal with a deadline like a competition or a specific date with a reward at the end will help maintain focus until the end. There is less chance of rewarding yourself prematurely. It would make me feel really dumb if I decided to have my post-race beer the night before a race then didn't finish my race the next morning. Performance training not only keeps me accountable, it also drives me to get up early on Sundays, fueling my competitive spirit. 

Performance is all about competition. Whether it is intrinsic, climbing your first 5.11 rock wall, or  social, scoring the winning goal for your vavi league, competition will drive you much more, and more sustainably than other motivators. Performance goals tend to have a reward that we are proud of beyond others. Achieving a feat breeds confidence in one's self. People tend to brag to friends and family as well as social media when they accomplish something new. It is an amazing feeling to say to yourself your hard work paid off, and even better to tell others.

Stay focused. Work hard. Train efficiently. Eat for Performance.

To The Top

Toned in 20! Day 1

Hey guys! So excited for #tonedin20! Check our Facebook page every day for the next 20 days for a workout of the day!  

Post a selfie doing the exercises of the day each day to win a prize at the end! 

Each workout will be a little bit different, but they will all target your arms, abs, butt, and legs to get you bikini (or swim trunk) ready!

 

TODAY'S WORKOUT: 

10 exercises.....

:45 per exercise/:15 break in between

x2

 

1. Mountain Climbers!  

Focus on maintaining your tempo throughout the whole :45. Keep your core tight and keep your shoulders square over your hands. 

2. Plank with hip extensions

Focus on maintaining your pelvic tilt- so no sagging in your low back and no arching when you lift your leg!  This exercise is meant to work your booty and your core! 

3. Squats

Focus on keeping your weight on your heels, chest up tall, tight core!

4. Sumo Squats

Wide stance, toes turned out, chest up tall, shoulders back, tight core: working your inner thighs and booty!

5. Reverse sit-ups

Slowly lower yourself back into a reverse sit-up until you feel like you're as far as you can pull yourself back up, keeping your elbows wide! *for more support, have a partner hold your feet!

6. Bicycle Crunches

Keep your elbows wide and chin up so you don't pull on your neck!

7.  Ab Wipers

Maintain your pelvic tilt, slowly lower your legs to either side, pausing in the middle *to increase difficulty, perform with straight legs

8.  Thrusters 

REALLY focus on making sure your back doesn't sag on the jump out, keep your core tight, and shoulders over your hands!

9. Hydrant Kicks

Pelvic tilt, "PEE ON THE HYDRANT", "KICK THE HYDRANT" ;)

10. Glute pulses

Make sure your hands are shoulder width, and focusing on glute contraction NOT using your low back :)

Setting Personal Records on the Reg

During the month of August, Lisa and I have chosen to work on ourselves from the inside out. We started by creating goals then we created a plan to achieve it. Our plan includes a list of potential obstacles and/or challenges we expect to encounter along the way. Then we developed a plan to tackle these issues when they arise. The goals we set follow the traditional S.M.A.R.T. goal format. I am looking to achieve a new P.R. at the Long Beach Half Marathon in October. This goal follows the S.M.A.R.T. format because it is:

Specific

Measureable

Attainable

Realistic

Timely

 

 Martin F. started with a vague goal, we talked and came up with a S.M.A.R.T. goal. Now he is on his second short-term goal and has set a new long-term goal; running the Long Beach Half Marathon. 

Martin F. started with a vague goal, we talked and came up with a S.M.A.R.T. goal. Now he is on his second short-term goal and has set a new long-term goal; running the Long Beach Half Marathon. 

S.M.A.R.T. goals have been used for a long time by businesses to help asses employees and to drive productivity. These 5 characteristics of a goal allow us to pass judgment on our ability to achieve the goal whether we do or don't. The S.M.A.R.T. goal must have an empirical value, a number. Your final goal might not be a S.M.A.R.T. goal, it might be vague in nature. One of the most common goals I hear as a trainer is "to lose weight." Another one is to be stronger or more fit. These are great goals, but the problem is that they aren't measurable nor specific. These goals need a number value, like losing 20 pounds, running a sub-6:00 mile, or dead lifting 300 lbs. Only then can we make a proper goal achievement plan.

 

  When I have a client who wants to lose 40+ pounds, I will break their goal into more compact short-term goals, like losing 15 pounds

 

Goals shouldn't be overly ambitious or lengthy, otherwise they can lead to failure or can be unrewarding because they take too long to achieve. When I have a client who wants to lose 40+ pounds, I will break their goal into more compact short-term goals, like losing 15 pounds. These are more manageable because they have less obstacles, simply due to the shorter amount of time it will take to achieve said goal. Also, short-term goals allow us to create evaluations that will help designing our goal-achievement plans or making adjustments.

 Ken has been one of my most dedicated clients ever. While his goal might be quite zealous, Ken always sets an achievement plan, stays focused day by day, and always achieves.                                @Glide_tc  

Ken has been one of my most dedicated clients ever. While his goal might be quite zealous, Ken always sets an achievement plan, stays focused day by day, and always achieves.          

                   @Glide_tc 

My last tip about goal-attaining is to stay focused and persistent. All achievements, especially in fitness and in health, take time and effort. Don't expect that because you make all these changes to your lifestyle that you will change immediately. Specifically, the physical changes take time to become visible. That is because the psychological change must be made first. Once you have a made up your mind on a goal you want to achieve, make a goal-achievement plan, assess the plan, then execute the plan.